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    Daily High Frequency Radar (HFR) surface current data (radial velocity files and total velocity file) from 2 different stations located on the French Mediterranean coast (Toulon), spanning from January 2012 to December 2019. The radial datasets have been processed to remove outliers. Then, the gaps in the data have been filled using the DINEOF algorithm. The total velocity is then reconstructed from the filled radial velocity files, and projected onto a cartesian grid of 1km x 1km. The HFR data comes from two systems, one monostatic radar PEY (located at Fort Peyras, La Seyne sur mer), and one bistatic POB (emitter located at Cap Bénat - Bormes les Mimosas, and transmitter on Porquerolles Island). The HFR data is initially hourly sampled. To remove the outliers of the data, for each timestep, a Probability Density Function (PDF) is computed on the spatial gradient of each radial map. Pixels with a spatial gradient with a probability under 3% are removed. Additionnally, for each pixel, a PDF is computed on the temporal gradient of its whole timeseries. Timesteps with a temporal gradient that have a probability under 1% are then removed. Then we proceed to a preliminary temporal and spatial hole filling of the missing data. For the timeseries of each pixel, timesteps that are surrounded by valid values within 3 hours (i.e. 3 timesteps) are filled by a weighted linear interpolation. For each timestep, pixels of the map surrounded by values within 1 grid point are filled in the same way. The radial data is then daily averaged. The DINEOF algorithm (http://modb.oce.ulg.ac.be/mediawiki/index.php/DINEOF) is run in a multivariate way (2 radial velocity files) using 50 EOF modes for the reconstruction. At some timesteps (shown by the flag variable of the file), the filling has not been possible, and the missing maps have been replaced by the temporal average radial map. The filled radial velocities are then locally interpolated onto a cartesian grid of 1km spatial resolution using a Weighted Least Square method. HF radar sites : - Peyras : 43°03'47.4"N, 5°51'40.3"E - Porquerolles (transmitter only): 42°58'59.0"N, 6°12'15.3"E - Bénat (receiver only): 43°05'31.5"N, 6°21'26.5"E EUROPEAN DIRECTORY OF MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PROJECTS (EDMERP) : - SICOMAR PLUS(12402), IMPACT(12271), MOOSE(11574), and JERICO NEXT(12227) EQUIPEMENTS: - High Frequency Surface Wave radar WERA from HELZEL MESSTECHNIK PARAMETERS: - sea surface current Citation: Molcard, A., & Bourg, N. (2021). HF RADAR - French Riviera (Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography) - daily surface currents filled with DINEOF [Data set]. MIO UMR 7294 CNRS. https://doi.org/10.34930/9263C4DF-4F55-4C5A-B183-C40EE1D844B1

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    What drives phytoplankton diversity at fine scales? Phytoplankton diversity is a key component in ocean biogeochemical services and contributes to the resilience and health of ocean ecosystems in respect to local and global stressors, including climate change. Understanding the mechanisms behind phytoplankton diversity in the open ocean is a matter of concern, especially in these years in which large Marine Protected Areas are created in international waters and an international legally binding treaty on Marine Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction is under negotiation. Model studies suggest that finescale ocean dynamics are an important driver of plankton diversity and several scenarios have been suggested. In situ observations however are difficult to perform, due to the ephemeral nature of finescale features and the difficulty of tracking them from available remote sensing. This observational limit will be largely reduced by the SWOT mission, in particular during the fast sampling phase, opening new possibilities to biophysical experiments in the open ocean. The BIOSWOT-Med campaign aims at exploiting SWOT observations for unveiling the drivers of phytoplankton diversity in the Western Mediterranean. The western Mediterranean Sea is characterized by high plankton diversity, low nutrient concentration, and weak oceanic circulation. Here, finescale features, even if weak and short-lived, can strongly modulate the microbial community structure. To study the finescale biophysical coupling, and its impact of phytoplankton diversity, the BIOSWOT-Med campaign will follow the temporal evolution of eddies and filaments over the western Mediterranean SWOT crossover. The physical-biochemical coupling at the frontal zone between Atlantic Water recently entered in the Mediterranean basin and modified Atlantic Water coming from cyclonic circulation in the western Mediterranean basin will be studied through an adaptive Lagrangian sampling strategy using the software SPASSO (Software Package for an Adaptive Satellite-based Sampling for Oceanographic cruises) developed in previous research cruises. This physical information will be paired by a multi-sensor characterization of the planktonic community, including advanced molecular (meta-transcriptomics, metagenomics and meta-barcoding) techniques, and the use of autonomous and robotic platforms. Institutes involved in the campaign: AMU, LOCEAN, CEA, CNR, CNRS, CSIC, Fisheries and Ocean Canada, IFREMER, IRD, MBARI, NWRA, OGS, SHOM, Sorbonne Université, SZN, UCSD, ULCO, University of Exeter, University of Washington.

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    Hourly High Frequency Radar (HFR) surface current data (ocean surface velocity) from 2 different stations located on the French Mediterranean coast (Toulon), processed in real time. The total velocity is then reconstructed from the filled radial velocity files, and projected onto a cartesian grid of 1km x 1km. The HFR data comes from two systems, one monostatic radar PEY (located at Fort Peyras, La Seyne sur mer), and one bistatic POB (receiver located at Cap Bénat - Bormes les Mimosas, and transmitter on Porquerolles Island). The HFR data is initially hourly sampled. The radial velocity are processed by an algorithm of Directional of Arrival Finding with a self-calibration method developed by our laboratory. HF radar sites : - Peyras : 43°03'47.4"N, 5°51'40.3"E - Porquerolles (transmitter only): 42°58'59.0"N, 6°12'15.3"E - Bénat (receiver only): 43°05'31.5"N, 6°21'26.5"E EUROPEAN DIRECTORY OF MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PROJECTS (EDMERP) : - SICOMAR PLUS(12402), IMPACT(12271), MOOSE(11574), and JERICO NEXT(12227) EQUIPEMENTS: - High Frequency Surface Wave radar WERA from HELZEL MESSTECHNIK PARAMETERS: - sea surface current Citation: - Dylan Dumas, Charles-Antoine Guerin, Self-calibration and antenna grouping for bistatic oceanographic High-Frequency Radars,2020, https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.10528

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    The present dataset is based on a nine site study of fine seabed topography in intertidal zones. Four coral sites (Maupiti A, B and C and Niau islands) and five rocky sites (Ars en Ré, Socoa, Parlementia A and B and Banneg island) have been explored. The data has been gathered using on-foot GNSS RTK for all sites (Trimble R8/R8S and Leica sytems) except Banneg island, where aerial Lidar data from Litto3D program has been used. The horizontal resolution varies between 3.8 and 12cm allowing to describe a wide range of spatial scales (generally over 3 spectral decades). The data has been processed to explore the statistical and spectral metrics which can be used to characterize the architectural complexity of seabeds. Owners: - Topographic survey on Ars-en-Ré : profile X, Z in meter along a transec was operated on 10-15 Jan 2021 with On-foot Trimble R8/R8S GNSS RTK by Shom, Gladys and Univ. de Montpellier - Topographic survey on Maupiti Hoe: profile X, Z in meter along a transec was operated on 5-10 July 2018 with on-foot Trimble R8/R8S GNSS RTK by GLADYS and Université de Montpellier - Topographic survey on Niau : profile X, Z in meter along a transec operated on 10 Nov. 2021 with On-foot Trimble R8/R8S GNSS RTK - by CEREGE and MIO (OSU Pytheas) - Topographic survey on Parlementia A, and B : profile X, Z in meter along a transec was operated on 22 Fev 2023 with on-foot Leica GNSS RTK by SIAME, UPPA - Topographic survey on Socoa : profile X, Z in meter along a transec was operated on 21 Fev 2023 with on-foot Leica GNSS RTK by SIAME, UPPA and Shom - Topographic survey in high resolution of Banneg island (X, Y, Z) is made by aerial lidar litto3D on spring 2012/2013 by Shom and IGN